Low Interest Credit Cards

1. Barclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite Mastercard Review

Barclaycard Arrival® Plus World Elite Mastercard® card art
Recommended Credit:
690
850
Excellent and Good Credit

Annual Fee

$89

Why We Like It:

"2X miles every purchase"

The Barclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard carries its weight in the travel reward credit card world. That's because it's not branded by one particular airline or hotel chain, leaving you to roam freely throughout the world as you redeem your travel purchase points.

While more experienced travelers—or those looking for good deals on luxury offerings—might be more willing to comb through the fine print of award travel options, you don't have to with this card. All you have to do is remember to use it when you make a purchase and watch those miles pile up.

That's right, there are no restrictive categories to keep track of. You can use your miles to pay off travel purchase charges including travel agencies and websites, airlines, hotels, car rentals and ground transportation, trains, cruises and ferries, timeshares, and campgrounds. So whether you are looking for a budget weekend getaway or a longer, luxurious stay, this card will come in handy.

2. HSBC Gold MasterCard

HSBC Gold MasterCard card art
Recommended Credit:
690
850
Excellent and Good Credit

Intro Period Months

15

Balance Transfer Fee

4%

Why We Like It:

"0% APR for 18mo on transfers/purchases"

The concept behind the HSBC Gold Mastercard is simple: Give consumers a fantastic, low-interest card, great for one-time purchases and balance transfers, and they will carry a balance from month to month. It’s designed to be a low APR card for those who need to charge a bigger balance, and that’s exactly what it allows consumers to do. What you give up in additional perks, you make up with a low maintenance, hassle-free card.

For most of the cards we review, we recommend not carrying a balance. That’s because interest can get expensive on a more typical card and you’ll often see us recommend that people build good credit habits by spending only what they can afford and paying their balance in full each month. You may be surprised to see that for this card we recommend the opposite. In a perfect world, you’ll never need an advance on a large sum of money, but we all know sometimes you need money you just don’t have—and that’s where the HSBC Gold Mastercard shines.

Whether transferring a balance or making a large purchase, the intro APR offer and below average residual APR on this card makes it a good choice for those who know they will need to carry a balance from month to month. Use it to finance new bedroom furniture or pay down an existing credit balance. When paid on time, you’ll see the amount owed get smaller and smaller, making this a great card for getting out of debt.

3. First Progress Mastercard® Secured Credit Card

First Progress Platinum Prestige Mastercard® Secured Credit Card card art
Recommended Credit:
300629
Bad and No Credit

APR

See terms*

Deposit

See terms*

Why We Like It:

"Build credit refundable deposit"

The First Progress Platinum Prestige Mastercard Secured credit card is one of a few options for people with bad credit, poor credit, limited credit or no credit at all. When it comes to First Progress cards, they offer limited perks and few incentives to new cardholders. On the bright side, however, a card from First Progress can make your financial situation seem less hopeless if you are one of many Americans who needs access to credit but has trouble getting approved for more competitive offers.

The selling point of the First Progress Platinum Prestige card is it provides an easy-to-navigate online path to approval. With no minimum credit score or credit history required, users can quickly and seamlessly complete an online application. If approved, the card issuer offers expedited processing for people who need to get plastic in their hands, quickly.

Of the three platinum cards offered by First Progress, the Platinum Prestige has the highest annual fee but offers the lowest interest rate, essentially allowing consumers to trade APR points for fee dollars. This could be the right card for someone who has a low credit score or no credit. That’s especially true if the consumer needs a card quickly and doesn’t mind making a deposit and paying fees in exchange for lower APR.